New Arrivals

 

Gardeners are instinctively attracted to the new and exciting!  It is human nature to crave the latest and the greatest, and what gardener doesn’t want to show off just a bit to his fellow gardeners!  Unfortunately, new doesn’t always mean better, so we are cautious in our recommendations in this category.  Indeed, some are of these selections are not “brand spanking new” but all are recent introductions to the trade or to our catalog listing.

Echinacea Green Twister Jelitto Seed 

Echinacea ‘Green Twister’

 

This unusual Coneflower was discovered as a mutation of the world-famous Echinacea ‘Magnus’, by Jelitto Seed Company of Germany. After years of refinement, Jelitto named and introduced ‘Green Twister.’ The lively green flowers show varying amounts of pink in the center, creating a pinwheel effect. The petals are arranged horizontally and petal tips are slightly spoon-shaped. Mature plants grow to 40”, although plants will be shorter their first year. ‘Green Twister’ makes a great addition to the perennial border and provides plenty of cut flowers. For best bloom, grow in full sun although the plants will also tolerate partial shade.
 

Photo from: Jelitto Seed

Baptisia ‘Pink Lemonade’

 

This newest member of the DECADENCE® series of False Indigo is sure to be a head-turner with its beautiful bicolored flowers of lemon yellow and raspberry pink. New varieties show distinct improvements over the native species Baptisia australis; in addition to bringing unique colors to the genus, the DECADENCE® varieties are more profuse blooming with larger thicker flower spikes, appearing on neat compact plants. ‘Pink Lemonade’ grows 3.5-4’ tall, prefers full sun and well-drained soil, and like all Baptisias is very long lived in the garden. Plants bloom in June and develop ornamental black seed pods.
 

Photo from: Walters Gardens

Baptisia Pink Lemonade

Heuchera ‘Wild Rose’

Heuchera ‘Wild Rose’

 

With all of the new Coral Bell varieties available each year, it is hard to know which to choose! We chose ‘Wild Rose’, the newest member of the PRIMO™ series, because these varieties have a reputation as excellent landscape plants. Larger and more vigorous due to H. villosa parentage, they are adaptable to many growing conditions from sun to shade. ‘Wild Rose’ has bright rosy purple foliage with charcoal veins, and burgundy stems bearing dark buds that open to rosy pink flowers on stems reaching 22” tall. Provide coral bells with well-drained loamy soil.


Photo from: Walters Gardens

Hosta ‘Waterslide’

 

This stunning new Proven Winners variety has wavy, rippled blue foliage that provides a cool, refreshing look to the shade garden. The blue color lasts well into the summer, unlike many older blue varieties that become green as the season progresses. The foliage has a thick, heavy substance that is unattractive to slugs. ‘Waterslide’ is a medium-sized hosta with a flat, horizontal growth habit that complements hostas of other sizes and shapes. The mound reaches 14”, with lavender flowers appearing in late summer on 17” scapes. A member of the Shadowland® series of Hostas.
 

Photo from: Walters Gardens

Hosta ‘Waterslide’

Peony Many Happy Returns Hollingsworth

Paeonia ‘Many Happy Returns’

 

Red peonies are justifiably popular and true reds are highly coveted. Although there are few peonies that are truly red, ‘Many Happy Returns’ comes close! The medium to large cardinal red blooms are fully double and borne on sturdy stems reaching 30” tall. It is classified as a midseason bloomer; in our area that means early June. ‘Many Happy Returns’ is a relatively new cultivar (introduced in 1986) that has won two awards from the American Peony Society: Gold Medal Winner 2007 and Award of Landscape Merit 2009. Peonies prefer full sun and rich, well-drained soil.

Photo from: Hollingsworth Peonies

Clematis ‘Stand By Me’

 

Unlike other varieties of Clematis that grow as a vine, this new hybrid is classified as a Bush Clematis because it does not produce vining or twining stems.  ‘Stand By Me’ is a hybrid of Clematis integrifolia, with a loose upright habit.  At 3 ft tall, it may benefit from light staking, but gardeners can plant it with other perennials that will support its willowy stems.  The bright blue bell-shaped flowers appear in late May and June, developing into clusters of fluffy cream seed heads.  In fall, cut plants back to the ground – no complicated pruning schedules required!  Prefers full sun to partial shade. 


    

Photo from: Walters Gardens

Clematis Stand by Me